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20130121
20130129
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KQED (PBS) 28
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English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
, dealing with infrastructure challenges and budget deficits. and we need to expand our tax base, and we need to take advantage of what's happening right now. >> reporter: exactly how we take advantage is ripe for debate, but most agree better education and visas for the scientists we train in the u.s. is a good start. and remember what i.b.m.'s myerson said about continuity-- it's just as important to a >> the moment you believe there is no danger of losing your edge is when it disappears on you. >> reporter: suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," at the watson research center. >> susie: the u.s. needs to make structural changes to restore its competitiveness. that's the main conclusion of an extensive study on american competitiveness by harvard business school professor michael porter. when i talked with him, we began our conversation by discussing why competitiveness matters for the u.s. economy. competitiveness is the coexistence of two things: one is a business environment in the united states that allows companies based here to compete successfully in the global economy but while maintaining or
, saving money on your taxes and boosting your retirement security. here's finra's gerri walsh. >> with washington roiling from one crisis to another, many americans feel uncertain about the impact of changing tax rates and how to achieve retirement security in a fragile economy. but, especially at times like this, workers should focus on what they can control. no matter your tax rate, contributing to a 401(k) can help you save money on taxes and boost your retirement security. your contributions to a traditional plan are not included in your taxable income, and earnings on roth contributions are tax-free. the good news for savers is that in 2013 401(k) limits go up to $17,500, and employees aged 50 or over can contribute an additional $5,500. but, at the end of 2011, the average account balance in 401(k)s nationwide was just under $60,000. if you're not sure you're doing all you can to lower your taxable wages and secure your retirement, finras new 401(k) save the max calculator can help you do the math to find out. i'm gerri walsh. >> tom: join us tomorrow on twitter for a tw
a new battle. >> we're now going to focus on the real problem, which is not that we tax too little but that we spend too much. >> the president's stared down the republicans. they blinked. gwen: the parties are over. now the hard part begins. covering the week, dan ball of "the washington post," martha raddatz of abc news, jeanne cummings of bloomberg news, and john harwood of cnbc and "the new york times." >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to connect our forces to what they need when they need it. >> to help troops see danger. before it sees them. >> to answer the call of the brave and bring them safely home. >> around the globe the people of boeing are working together to support and protect all who serve. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by prudential, additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation. the corporatio
back to california. governor jerry brown says he's fixed the state budget by increasing taxes and keeping a tight rein on spending. he declared an end to the state's prison crisis. correspondent spencer michels sat down with the governor earlier this week in an interview for the pbs "newshour." in this segment, they discuss whether california is really out of the woods and the governor's plans for the future. >> governor jerry brown, thanks very much for talking with us. >> sure. >> governor, proposition 30 in california was sold that it would help the schools and almost exclusively help the schools. are the california schools out of the woods? >> you say out of the woods. we live in the woods, so we don't get out of the woods. but the money is definitely going to the schools. it's very helpful. we're paying down the debt. the state took in borrowing $2.7 billion from the schools and over the next five years we're going to pay back our debts to the schools from the state and they're going to see per kid over about $2,300 per kid for all 6 million kids in california. it's going
nonsense because it involves raising taxes. i think you have to do bovment i think you have to have more revenue and you have to cut back spending. >> susie: let's say congress doesn't do that. what happens next? explain to people what happens next. >> i think the real risk is that we come to a showdown in march when the current stopgap budget ends and we face the government shutdown. people will lose services. people will lose jobs. and there will be a fiscal contraction, on top of the ones that we've already put in place. and that's not great for the economy, for sure. >> you know, and this whole conversation about a budget and the deficit and all of that. it's all about raising taxes and cutting spending. and there's no discuss about growth. and that is what americans really want. growth and jobs. what do we have to do to get growth? >> well, the badh6+suz there, susie s that while higher growth is by far the best remedy, it's very hard to put if into effect. in a sizable way. you need more investment in human beings, that's education and so on. you need more investment in physical pl
taxes passed. the budget looks a lot better. i think this was the governor's chance to pivot, to pivot to talking about what makes california great, how we get them back on track. don't worry, we're getting there. so i took this as a real optimistic speech with a lot of details, a lot of brown history facts. and really a message i think not only to the legislature but to the public of, like, i'm watching it. we're going to be careful, but we're going to move forward. >> and, john, you mentioned he was very quirky in his speech. clearly the governor is enjoying his popularity right now and quoted everyone from philosophers and poets. let's take a listen. >> i'm sorry, say again? >> the most diverse, creative and longest standing mass migration in the history of the world. that's california, and we are sons and daughters. this special destiny never ends. it slows. it falters. it goes off the track. and ignorance and prejudice but soon resumes again. more vibrant and more stunning in its boldness. >> so, john, how has the speech been received by lawmakers, both democrats and republicans?
investment they hear taxes and when he talks about takers which he did in the speech, that's a loaded word. it aims right at paul ryan who talked about takers versus makers, the takers being the one who receive federal benefits but pay no federal income tax. that's a shot. that's not just language that's slipped in. so that's the sense in which this had a combative -- there were a few barbs in this speech. >> one of the moments in the campaign when the president was office balance was when he said you didn't build it, talking about small business. that was one of the big themes of the speech saying you need collective action in order to get anything done. again, not new but laying down real markers act the fact that he's going to night the second term for a progressive vision based on those historical touchstones john mentioned and a program that is based on things that right now republicans have no interest in working with him on. in terms of gun control and climate change, immigration and budget stuff different issue. >> jodi let me go back to your point in your piece about the "new york
. they need a breather now. they've been on the defense for a year on tax cuts for millionaires, on toughness, shutting down the government, they're not going to compromise. they need to recalbright here, a reset button needs to be pushed and it seems like in every aspect of government. and fight on future spending, not on obligations already incur. >> ifill: in the inaugural address this week, we saw the president lay out his gold for what he wants the next four years-- or the next year at least to be. what is the republican counter to that? >> i think the republicans have recalbrighted their tactics but not their end goals. they're in favor of cutting spending without new revenues. paul ryan this morning said no new revenues. the president has gotten all the revenues he will get. they have doubled down on spending cuts. they say they have a plan that will balance the federal budget in 10 years. you can only do that without revenues if you have really devastating cuts on all kinds of domestic programs and we'll see if they're willing to deliver on that. >> ifill: one democrat today and repub
new ideas and technology to remake our government, revamp our tax code, reform our schools and empower our citizens with the skills they need to work harder, learn more, reach higher. but while the means will change, our purpose endures. a nation that rewards the effort and determination of every single american. that is what this moment requires. that is what will give real meaning to our creed. >> brown: with today's ceremony falling on martin luther king day the president reflected on civil rights battles passed and noted the country had still not achieved goals of equality, opportunity and more. >> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal. is the star that guides us still. just as it guided our forebearers through seneca falls and selma and stonewall, just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsung, who left footprints along this great mall to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone, to hear a king proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on earth. it is now our ge
's direction and tired of partisan gridlock. chambliss had angered tea party forces when he supported tax increases as part of a plan to tame the federal deficit. wall street closed the week with another rally. the dow jones industrial average gained 70 points to close near 13,896. the nasdaq rose 19 points to close at 3,149. the s&p 500 finished above 1,500 for the first time since 2007. for the week, the dow gained nearly 2%; the nasdaq rose half a percent. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: we turn to israel, where prime minister benjamin netanyahu is working to build his coalition after tuesday's election. the contest saw a surprisingly strong showing from a centrist party led by a former television personality. margaret warner is in jerusalem. i spoke with her a short time ago. >> so margaret, a few days after the election what kind of government seems to be taking shape? >> jeff, i'm told that bebenetanyahu is trying to put together a very broad coalition, not relying just on the trawl religious and ultra conservative and settler movement crowd t
it does make tough decisions on taxes, on spending, on energy policy, that america has some credibility that we got it more right than wrong. >> tell me about the lobbyists. who are these people? >> well, the problem with lobbyists, a lot of them come off the hill, a lot of them come out of congress. many members of congress leave the capital and go to k street. and it's a real reflection of how money has overtaken politics. and the real problem with that system is not the individual lobbyists. a lot of times they'll have legitimate points to present to members of congress. the problem is the amount of money that lobbyists represent. and what tends to happen in congress is that the concerns of those lobbyists, the concerns of amgen, become much more of the topic of discussion, debate, and resolution than the concerns of middle america, the concerns of the farmers. you know, in congress, we didn't even vote in the house on a farm bill. this is the first time in the history of this country where a house agriculture committee, on which i sat, but in a bipartisan vote, we worked together, p
remains strong. also tomorrow, the best thing you can do now to save on taxes and boost your retirement security. details in our "money file" segment. the admission by lance armstrong that he took performance enhancing drugs came only after companies like nike, radio shack and others paid him millions of dollars to endorse their products but then dropped him. here's rick horrow with tonight's "beyond the scoreboard." >> reporter: oftentimes, the best athletes also are the best sales people. with so much money available from endorsements, the incentive to lie and cheat is multiplied as their stardom rises. in the last few years, several high-profile athletes have been brought down by scandal: golfer tiger woods with his extramarital affairs; olympic swimmer michael phelps with smoking marijuana; and, of course, lance armstrong with doping. in each case, the damage done to their image had the collateral effect of costing them multi- millions of dollars in endorsement money. in a sense, it's warranted to blame athlete lying and cheating on big paychecks from sponsors. as long as playing co
out of town. and interestingly, based on some spending cuts and tax increases that have been implemented so far, we're pretty close. and jack lew intimately knows what it takes to get from here to there. now, i think you, also, to, about other issues of the treasury's beat, international currency, financial markets, implementing the dodd-frank issue. as i mentioned, financial reform is still incomplete. so jack lew is going to have to oversee those as well. >> susie: let me get back to the budget issue. jack lew was also the architect of this sequester mechanism. a lot of people are worried if that kicks in, the automatic spending cuts, that, you know, that would really be a bad thing for the economy. some democrats are surprisingly saying maybe that's a good way to handle this whole budget cuts. where do you think jack lew stands on that? and, unfortunately, we just have half a minute left. what do you think? >> well, i think jack recognizes that if the sequester kicks in, it does two things. one, it makes deficit savings a lot more pronounced. that's $85 billion in one year
, see any cap-and-trade type climate change legislation. he certainly not going to see any higher taxes coming out of the republican congress. >> brown: i'm sure you started the day with some hope in the church. where do you come out now after listening to this? >> i think there's still hope. i do think it's critical that we have a common vision that we work on. in my sermon today with the president i just said it may be the most important thing that you have on your agenda is to bring us together. if you can find some way, if we can find some way to come together around a couple of common, you know, common objectives, that helps us resolve some of these other things. right now we're so divided that no matter what comes up, we're going to find the same gridlock we have right now. i ti there's got to be... this has got to be an agenda near the top of the agenda to say -- i'm not minimizing anything else, those all need to happen -- they're not going to happen until we figure out how we work together, listen to one another, embrace the differences and find some way to forge forward. i don
, there is a joke that has gone around israel for some time that a third of the people pay taxes, a third of the people work, and a third of the people go in the army and the problem is they're all the same third. ( laughter ) what you actually found now is people saying enough. the fact is you had-- bebe made a deal with kadima, created a broadbased government, and they were going to resolve this question of the haridi serving in the military and what the fair burden would be. and a commission worked out something and in the end, the prime minister decided that he felt that the character of that deal just was not one he could live with. i think that came back to haunt him in a fairly big way. so i think, number one, it's sharing the burden in a sense that if the country was going to go to the right the way it appeared to be, there was going to be no sharing of the burden. secondly, i think there is a sense of the main stream in israel feeling, wait, the character of likud, when benny baggan can't qualify for the list, when dan meriddor can't qualify for the list, the people who are on
to make certain that there are no problems in terms of their background, to pay a fine, to pay their taxes, and then they would be here in a probationary status where they could not be deported. they could work. and we watched them as a number of other things evolve and progress under the bill. border security leading to green cards, leading to citizenship. >> woodruff: we hear some advocacy organizations saying, wait a minute. even that level of requirement is going to be a disincentive. they're not going to want to sign up if they have to pay a fine and so forth. >> well, i'll tell you. that's going to be part of it. we believe that these people who have lived here for so many years in fear and have tried to make a best of their lives and the lives of their families are prepared to earn their way into legal status and to citizenship. and the argument that they would not pay a fine and such, i really think that will not be a major obstacle. we went through this with the deferred deportation under the dream act. almost 400,000 people came forward. they paid the amount that was necessary. >
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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